Singing Medicine
for Adults

Stroke and Dementia Support

Long Covid Recovery Singing Programme

Every Friday since 2004, Ex Cathedra’s award winning Singing Medicine team has brought singing to hospitals around the UK.

Singing is a special activity that improves wellbeing. Research shows that singing positively impacts the body in many ways:

  • oxytocin (feel-good hormone) is released
  • cortisol (hormone responsible for stress and feelings of isolation) is reduced
  • natural opioids (pain relief) are released
  • every part of the brain is stimulated
  • the deeper breathing required aids healing and fights infection
  • the core is engaged

Coping mechanisms and distraction

Aiding communication

Creative stimulation

Improving mood and wellbeing

Stroke and Dementia

The wellbeing effects of singing can help patients and their families affected by stroke and dementia in many ways.

We hope you enjoy our videos, made especially to enable and enhance communication and feelings of wellbeing.

Stroke and Dementia Support

Long Covid Support

Research is showing that singing can aid recovery for people affected by Long Covid.

Long Covid Recovery Singing Programme

“Finding you can sing, my husband tells me, is like finding temporary freedom from imprisonment. Suddenly, you do have a voice and you can express yourself and be understood by others. It is psychologically uplifting.”

Spouse

Singing Medicine Wellbeing Groups

Ladywood Choir
ladywood-choir-logo

“We believe everyone should sing. It makes you feel better!” – Group Leader

The group meets weekly in Ladywood and all are welcome. Our singing circle set-up is part of our inclusive ethos. Sessions are led by Singing Medicine team member Marianne Ayling.

“The singing sessions give me a reason to feel connected to my community”

Participant

Click below to access our Singing Medicine programmes for adults.

Stroke and Dementia Support

Long Covid Recovery Singing Programme